Masters in Molecular & Environmental Toxicology

The Molecular & Environmental Toxicology Program is a PhD-First program; meaning, that we expect the applicants who we make offers to are coming to complete a PhD. We do this because faculty members tend to want PhD students. A student spends approximately three years in a lab before becoming independent on his/her project. The average masters degree is completed in two years, so it makes sense why faculty members would want a trained student to stay longer. For this reason, only PhD offers carry a guarantee of funding.

However, for some, a PhD is not the main desirable; a masters degree will enable the student to achieve career goals. This could include career prospects only requiring a masters degree, a person already in a career who does not have the time to complete a PhD, or someone who is filling a “bridge year” before professional school. While our students are not guaranteed of funding, they could still be eligible for funding, either through a lab offer or by working as a teaching or project assistant. The program will not facilitate such a match. It is the responsibilities of the student to apply for external funding.

As a student in our masters program is paying his/her own way, the student is not expected to rotate in a lab; if they find a suitable mentor who is able to support him/her scholastically, the student can be directly admitted into that lab.

In addition, it is possible that a student will not even conduct research; this is the “non-thesis” masters track. This student will fulfill credit requirements via coursework and will complete the degree with a topic / literature review of toxicological relevance.

Information about both tracks is below. If you have questions about either, please contact the program administrator Mark Marohl.

Thesis Masters

In this degree, a total of 30 credits is required. At the end, a thesis is drafted and defended before a committee. This is based on the research conducted in the laboratory of the mentor. This results is expected to be deposited with the Graduate School.

Core Courses (12cr)
MET 625: Toxicology I (3cr)
MET 626: Toxicology II (3cr)
MET 631: Toxicants in the Environment (3cr)
MET 699: Prelim A Course (1cr)
OBGYN 955 (or equivalent): Responsible Conduct of Research (2cr)

“Focus” course (3cr)
Molecular Examples: ONC 703; PHARM 630
Environmental Examples: MET 632-3-4;

Remainder: MET 990 Research Credits

Non-Thesis Masters 

In this degree, a total of 30 credits is required. At the end, a literature review is drafted and defended before a committee. This is based either on a toxicological relevant topic or on incomplete experiments from a laboratory experience.

Core Courses (9cr)
MET 625: Toxicology I (3cr)
MET 626: Toxicology II (3cr)
MET 631: Toxicants in the Environment (3cr)
MET 699: Prelim A Course (1cr)
OBGYN 955 (or equivalent): Responsible Conduct of Research (2cr)

“Focus” course (3cr)
Molecular Examples: ONC 703; PHARM 630
Environmental Examples: MET 632-3-4;

Remainder: Further coursework; possibly including MET 990 Research Credits